Thursday, 7 July 2011

Shadow of Swords

This morning the card that confronts me from Ellen Lorenzi-Prince's Tarot of the Crone is the Shadow of Swords. 

The Shadow cards are the negative aspect of the suit, taken to its extreme, and replace the Kings of traditional decks, without any suggestion of similarity.  This image, the Shadow of the suit of Swords, shows someone who is fragmented, made up of jagged ideas that don't hold together, yet are rigidly precise.  There is a distinct coldness to this shadow.

I am grateful that I rarely feel fragmented.


I am thankful that my ideas no longer control me to the detriment of feeling and emotional warmth.

8 comments:

  1. Interesting Card - drawing our attention to the shadow side. I don't really know what I make of this image, it's stark and sharp and in it I see hardness, and rigidity yet unable to soften their approach in order to bring things together in a way that is approachable.

    I understand the fragmented element shown in this card, yet I am not seeing this as fragmented so much as regimented. All those pieces seem somehow organised into a strict pattern. No room left to manoeuvre.

    No sure what I think of this deck. Hmmm

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  2. Hi Helen,
    It might sound strange, but the Shadow cards are some of my favourites in this deck! The Shadow of Cups shows someone drowning in their emotion, for instance. OK, so it's dark, but I think it's good to look at what the shadow extreme of the suit is. Perhaps, too, if you don't work with reversals much it's a useful approach?
    I'm not 100% keen on the artwork, but I think the cards have a lot of interesting things to say...
    I agree with you about the rigidity leaving no room to manoeuvre. I also think that when someone is that rigid, they can only maintain it by dividing things up into little bits, including themselves, so they can accept some and reject others - hence the fragmentation.
    Cx

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  3. The Crone represents 'the old wise one'. She is there to help us with issues of our past, loss, sorrows, and death. There is a deep darkness in all of life that the Crone steeps herself in. The Archetypal Crone is there to help us come to terms, to heal, and then to be reborn into a new beginning. She is the midwife of death and rebirth and comes to us when we are lonely, grieving or lost. This image is of one who has lost touch with the ebb and flow of real life. One must know the dark before one recognises the light. It is not always a bad thing for the brittle to shatter.

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  4. What an interesting deck! I'll have to investigate it further (not that I need another one). ;)

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  5. Hi Cat,

    Very well, put, thank you! This deck certainly encompasses that darkness-steeped Crone, and the wisdom she draws from her experience. As for it being no bad thing for the brittle to shatter, I'd agree. Still, it's good to know there's a safety net to help put you back together after...
    Chloe

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  6. Hi Whispering,
    Ah, you may not need another deck, but then maybe you do - I'm sure you learn something different from each one ;->
    Chloë
    (Enabler Extraordinaire)

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  7. Very intense card. I can see why you'd like these. You have the most interesting deck collection--most of them I've never even heard of!

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  8. Hi MM,
    Well, I'm a member of a dangerous group called TABI! Lots of tarot addicts in one place, can you say "enable" ;D And on Facebook a friend started a group called Tarotholics Anonymous :))
    C

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