Monday, 9 March 2015

Prisma Visions Tarot Reading

This week's deck is another self-published one, the Prisma Visions Tarot by James Eads.  Recently published in its first edition, I wouldn't be surprised if there were more, as it's a deck that is beautiful and readable, with a quirky extra that is fabulous.  Anyhow, more details on Friday, for now let's get to the week's reading.

Now: Seven of Pentacles

A man plants Pentacles in the ground, sowing the seeds for a better future.  In the moment, though, there is plenty of work to be done. 

I certainly hope I'll be able to get some work done this week.  Last week I ended up seeing four different doctors on three consecutive days with Little One. Nothing serious, but it put the kibosh on re-editing the Wings of Change Lenormand images after the prototype deck came out a bit grey for my taste.  Tomorrow he'll be going into hospital for a minor op, then hopefully I can get going again.

Don't: the Wheel of Fortune

Isn't this a lovely, swirling, powerful Wheel?  A peacock seems to tangle with a couple of snakes in a writhing mass. 



As the card of what not to do this week, I see a message here about not changing for changes sake, and to be careful of who/what I take on.  Coupled with the last card, there is a suggestion, too, that any gains will take hard work, rather than being bestowed by the Universe.

Do: King of Wands 

I love the sense of movement and growth to this King of Wands, almost like the lines of light you see when someone swings a flaming torch, and the light leaves patterns on your retina so you see the whole pattern.  The flowers suggest that despite the fires of enthusiasm, there is growth and rootedness here, too.

As advice, it seems there is a need for enthusiasm but with a long perspective.  A willingness to lead by example, and to bring light to the darkness.

For journal prompts based on these cards, click here.

8 comments:

  1. Tarot is one of the most interesting and complex systems to predict the future and psychological analysis of human life. In fact, historians and researchers do not know where the topic he comes and when exactly was created.
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  2. I am really on the fence about this deck. On one hand, the illustrations are beautiful and unusual, but I wonder if it would be one of the art decks that look nice but don't have much depth. I'll be keeping an eye on your blog to find out! :D

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    1. My review on Friday is going to be mostly favourable. It's a bit busy, but other than that I find it very beautiful and readable :)

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  3. I've seen this deck around a lot on Instagram (that and the Wild Unknown). I think it is artistically beautiful .. and I like what I think you describe as the quirky detail, if we're thinking about the same thing.

    Not sure it is one for me, but I look forward to your review at the end of the week!

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  4. Just saw the 2 of Cups and 2 of Swords on Instagram after writing that. Love them. Such energy and movement in these illustrations!

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    1. Yes, the energy and movement are amazing, and I love that the Majors have borders, compared to the rest of the cards. Really makes them feel like markers that change the flow around them. One of the few negatives is that there is perhaps a bit too much swirly energy everywhere...

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  5. I love seeing this deck in action. The photos I've seen of the cards are so gorgeous! I like the unique approach the artist took. The 7 of Pents is lovely, reminds me of little red riding hood ;-)

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    1. That's an interesting association, Olivia. Yes, I think there is plenty in the symbolism to help trigger our intuition in a reading. I notice more that the red clothing echoes a single fruit up in the tree, a reminder that we hope to reap the fruit of our hard work :)

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